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20121006
20121014
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
already had an associate's degree and that was considered too much education. she now working at a credit union and making $30,000 a year. she was making 45,000 at leviton. these are small margins. >> i know the magazine also took a look at which industries were hiring. where should people be focusing? >> there are actually surprisingly a lot of booming jobs in america. those jobs don't pay much. but in the top ten growing jobs, we have the biggest jobs like nurses and home health care workers and personal age aides because our aging population. those jobs pay $20,000, a year, not a lot, but the fastest growing job in america. we have carpentry and people in the construction trades. those jobs through 2020 are expected to boom and the reason for that is they shed about 50% of their jobs during the housing downturn and then we have other interesting professions that are growing that you wouldn't expect. biomedical engineers that also has to do with health care and those jobs pay a lot or even veterinvet ruinary technicians, people who work as assistants to vets. >> even in a downturn, the
and paid for education and other services, it comes out of the coal field -- the coal mines and oil fields. the question becomes, is there a balance? i am a rancher by trade and i clearly understand you need economic development, but also conservation. my favorite book is holistic resource management buy out unsavory. -- by allan savory. there'll be areas where you want to protect the wildlife, but there are areas where you need to make a living. that is where sometimes the extreme environmentalists do not understand that those of us in montana need to make a living. i will stand with those counties that will try to produce the jobs for those industries. >> i did not bail wall street out and i put cops on the beat to deal with industry that you did not square with, by the way. you can say what you want, but it does not meet the test of truthfulness. when a driver everything, agriculture, oil and gas, natural resources -- we need a little bit of everything, and agriculture, oil and gas, natural resources. our recreation economy is $3 billion a year in this state to make sure we have opportu
's talk about education. let's talk about training. let's talk about new jobs. let's talk about infrastructure. let's talk about our different vision for massachusetts. that's what the people of massachusetts want to talk about. and that's what i think they ought to hear about. >> i think about 10 or 15 minutes in, romney began to realize this was not the easy exercise he thought it was going to be. >> narrator: then romney faltered. the issue was health care. >> i have a plan. i have a position paper on health care. i'm happy to show it to you, senator, any time you'd like. >> mr. romney, it isn't a question of showing me your paper. it's a question of showing all of the people in here that are watching this program the paper. they ought to have an opportunity to know. what is the cost of your program? >> i don't have a cost of my program. >> you don't have a cost? >> no, i'm sorry, i don't have... >> what would be the impact of that on the budget? >> well, the impact, i do not know the specific number. >> so you don't have a cost. >> the impact of that on the budget, senator k
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)